ACLU of Georgia

Legislative Scorecard – Voter Rights and Democracy Bills

SB 202–  Voter Suppression Bill 
ACLU of GA Position: OPPOSED 
STATUS: PASSED

  • SB 202 criminalizes Georgians who give a drink of water to their neighbors, allows the State to take over county elections, and retaliates against the elected Secretary of State by replacing him with a State Board of Elections Chair chosen by the legislature—rather than the voters; dramatically restricts absentee by mail voting; Limits dropboxes; Makes runoff elections virtually impossible to administer by moving them to 28 days after the general election (28-day runoff). Disenfranchises eligible voters on Election Day who cast provisional ballots inside their own counties but outside their one assigned polling location; invites challenges to lawful voters, Creates county budget shortfalls through cuts and unfunded mandates.

HB 531–  Voter Suppression Bill 
ACLU of GA Position: OPPOSED 
STATUS: DID NOT PASS

  • HB 531 would have gutted EARLY VOTE and SUNDAY VOTING; DISENFRANCHISED ELECTION DAY VOTERS and RESTRICTED VOTE BY MAIL.

 SB 241–  Voter Suppression Bill 
ACLU of GA Position: OPPOSED
STATUS:
DID NOT PASS

  • SB 241 attacked absentee voting, sought to ban mobile voting units. SB 241 would have required legislative approval for state consent agreements and emergency rule changes, established voter fraud hotline, allowed legislative delegations to suspend elections supervisors, and the regulated timeline for processing mail ballots, etc.

SB 62–  Voter Suppression Bill; Absentee Ballot Restrictions
ACLU of GA Position: OPPOSED
STATUS:
DID NOT PASS

  •  SB 62 sought to place arduous, costly, and unnecessary restrictions on the handling of absentee voting.

SB67– Voter Suppression Bill; Absentee Ballot Restrictions 
ACLU of GA Position: OPPOSED  
STATUS:
DID NOT PASS

  • SB 67 sought to place more restrictions on the application process for an absentee ballot by creating the requirement that those who apply for an absentee ballot must submit photocopies of their ID in addition to their application.

SB 69–  Voter Suppression Bill; Elimination of Automatic Voter Registration
ACLU of GA Position: OPPOSED 
STATUS: DID NOT PASS

  • SB 69 sought to eliminate the automatic voter registration (AVR) system in Georgia, which registers or updates voter registration information when eligible Georgians apply for a driver’s license, renew a license, or submits a change of address information with the Georgia Department of Driver Services (DDS).

SB 71– Voter Suppression Bill; Elimination of No-Excuse Absentee Voting
ACLU of GA Position: OPPOSED  
STATUS: FAILED

  • SB 71 sought to eliminate no-excuse absentee voting and set strict new requirements to qualify for absentee voting.

SB 74– Voter Suppression Bill 
ACLU of GA Position: OPPOSED 
STATUS: FAILED

  • This bill provides poll watchers access to all areas of the tabulation center (where ballots are received and processed) but this bill incorrectly protects the poll observers and not the local elections officials. The Officials are the people who go through the ongoing intimidation and harassment and would still be subjected to this under SB74.

SB 93–  Voter Suppression Bill 
ACLU of GA Position: OPPOSED  
STATUS: DID NOT PASS

  • Senate Bill 93 eliminated mobile voting units, a popular and secure voting method.

SB 141–  Voter Suppression Bill; Restrictions on Vote Tabulation
ACLU of GA Position: OPPOSED
STATUS: DID NOT PASS
  

  • SB 141 sought to place burdensome restrictions on the vote tabulation process.

SB 178–  Voter Suppression Bill; Prohibition on Sending Out Unsolicited Absentee Ballots
ACLU of GA Position: OPPOSED
STATUS: DID NOT PASS
  

  • Senate Bill 178 sought to prohibit the Secretary of State and local election officials from sending unsolicited absentee ballot applications to registered voters.

SB 232–  Voter Suppression Bill; 
ACLU of GA Position: OPPOSED 
STATUS: DID NOT PASS

  • Senate Bill 232  would have required the addition of a bar code and accompanying tracking number to all absentee ballots and envelopes which had the potential to violate the privacy of citizens who vote in Georgia.

SB 253–  Polling location changes notice 
ACLU GA Position: SUPPORTED  
STATUS: DID NOT PASS

  • Senate Bill 253 would have ensured that if a polling location is moved, notices of the new location must be posted during the seven days before the day of the election and on Election Day. This bill also would have removed the burden of the last-minute change which would only cause more confusion.

SR 100–  Voter Suppression Bill 
ACLU of GA Position: OPPOSED 
STATUS: DID NOT PASS

  • Senate Resolution 100 would add an amendment to the Georgia Constitution that would set up statewide grand juries to investigate and hand down indictments over any election law violation.

HB 59– Ranked choice voting and runoff timeline 
ACLU position: OPPOSED  
STATUS: DID NOT PASS

  • House Bill 59 would have introduced a  ranked-choice “special” document versus requiring another absentee ballot in a run-off. Although Ranked Choice Voting has some positive impacts, this would have treated voters differently based in voting in person or by mail, and more research is needed to determine its impact on voters.

HB 270– Voter Suppression Bill; Shortens Absentee Ballot Application Window
ACLU of GA Position: OPPOSED  
STATUS: DID NOT PASS

  • House Bill 270 would have shortened the absentee ballot application window. The bill would have also mandated that local election officials must mail out the application within three days of receiving the application.

HB 701– Voter Suppression Bill 
ACLU of GA Position: OPPOSED  
STATUS: DID NOT PASS

  • House Bill 701 would add the definition of “superintendent” as an appointed individual appointed by the State Election Board to exercise power over the election. The state board may also suspend these counties or municipal superintendents and appoint someone to take their place. The Superintendent has all power to make decisions regarding poll watchers, election officials, and supervisors.